Dota 2: 40,000 accounts banned for abusing matchmaking

With another string of bans, Valve continues to work towards a cheater-free experience for DOTA players. The company announced on the official twitter account for DOTA that more than 40, accounts had been banned. A policy change soon followed, according to which the bans would be on the steam accounts of the players. Earlier bans usually banned just the DOTA accounts of the cheaters. We have banned over 40, accounts for players who were found abusing matchmaking. These bans will now appear as game bans in Steam as well as being matchmaking bans in Dota 2. That is a pretty vague explanation, but the ban is most likely on boosters. Dota 2 players can turn to a friend or use paid services to raise the MMR of their accounts, allowing them to illegitimately be ranked more highly. Just recently, it hit a historically low player count in December.

Dota 2 News: Valve issues ban to over 40,000 accounts

As the next season of Ranked DOTA 2 games descends on the player base, Valve seems to have a few changes up its sleeves. After changing the matchmaking rank MMR system and overhauling the matchmaking system as a whole, Valve has solidified the changes it thinks are necessary for the game. The main changes in the update are regarding the previous changes to the matchmaking system.

It improved upon new concepts that were introduced, with Valve taking a more proactive role when it came to smurfs and account buyers. These problems have been plaguing the DOTA 2 community for as long the game has been out. Can these updates change how the game is played today?

The official Twitter account of dota 2 recently tweeted, informing the community of over 40, bans to player accounts abusing matchmaking.

Dota 2: goodbye, toxic! There is no doubt that the MOBA communities are among the most toxic in the world. Insults can already be included in part of the experience, although titles such as Dota 2 and League of Legends have the prohibition of these cases in their bases. Valve a few months ago began to perform sweeps on their servers to detect the most toxic users and have begun to take them out of the game.

We have banned over 40, accounts for players who were found abusing matchmaking. These bans will now appear as game bans in Steam as well as being matchmaking bans in Dota 2. Valve simply does not tolerate such actions. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Sign in. Log into your account.

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Multiple Dota Bans!

The official Twitter account of dota 2 recently tweeted, informing the community of over 40, bans to player accounts abusing matchmaking. Although it is not clear what kind of matchmaking abuse Valve is referring to, it can be various elements like boosting, reverse boosting, queuing for the same language and getting preset teammates which increases the chances of winning in solo queue and many more manipulative methods of gaining MMR.

The developers took a more stern step this time by issuing game bans and match-making bans to the abusers. This will make sure that the abusers cannot play dota 2 online anymore, removing them from most game modes. We have banned over 40, accounts for players who were found abusing matchmaking.

For you sparkling examples of good behaviour, there are somewhat less harrowing changes to matchmaking this season. Dota 2 will now try to.

Home Discussions Workshop Market Broadcasts. Change language. Install Steam. Store Page. Dota 2 Store Page. This topic has been locked. Hi all, not sure what happened. I just got a 1 year matchmaking ban. My behaviour score is 9k. My last ranked match was about 4 hours ago. During this match, I got randomly disconnected while beating my opponent when windows detected an “IP conflict”.

Valve Bans Over 40,000 Dota 2 Players For Abusive Matchmaking

As we all know, Valve always had this resolve in creating a fair environment within the Dota 2 community. And that includes their fight against players who are abusing the system. We have banned over 40, accounts for players who were found abusing matchmaking. These bans will now appear as game bans in Steam as well as being matchmaking bans in Dota 2. This punishment that came in with the February 11th update is much more different than the year ban Valve had last September.

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Valve banned more than 40, Dota 2 accounts this week, doling them out to players who were found abusing the matchmaking system. We have banned over 40, accounts for players who were found abusing matchmaking. These bans will now appear as game bans in Steam as well as being matchmaking bans in Dota 2. February 11, Experienced players making additional accounts so they can beat up lower ranked players has been a perennial problem in Dota 2, and plenty of other games with matchmaking, and the recent bans coincide with a game update that tackles the issue.

Valve often targets large numbers of smurf accounts, like the 17, it banned in January last year. The accounts were found to be abusing matchmaking to get into ranked. In it also introduced changes to how the matchmaking rating was calculated and the aforementioned smurf detection system.

Valve issues another massive wave of bans in Dota 2

Dota 2 continues to have issues with matchmaking due to a lot of smurfs and hackers. Today, Valve has banned more than 40, accounts alone this week. These players were banned for abusing matchmaking, which means smurfing. What is Smurfing? Well, pro and experienced players make new accounts and start from beginning to match against beginners.

I got 8-years ban, but I: never used lp bots, actually never played lp games never paid for mmr boosting because nobody but myself played on this .

Gamereactor uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best browsing experience on our website. If you continue, we’ll assume that you are happy with our cookies policy. Don’t you just hate it when you queue up for a match in your new favourite game and get destroyed by a team of high-level players? Well, so does Valve, it would seem as it just recently swung its banhammer so hard it could most likely be heard across the surface of Tellus.

The bans in question were focused on Dota 2 players “abusing matchmaking“, which most likely refers to players boosting, de-ranking and using smurf accounts. In English, not video game speak, this would mean playing with a team of higher-ranking players, voluntarily doing bad to lower ones rank and play worse players and using a brand-new, separate account to play new players as a game veteran, respectively.

These bans will now appear as game bans in Steam as well as being matchmaking bans in Dota 2. People are already starting to cause an uproar in the comments on the Twitter announcement , so we’re guessing the bans weren’t popular with those banned. Cookies Gamereactor uses cookies to ensure that we give you the best browsing experience on our website.

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Valve Hands Out 19-Year Bans to Abusive DOTA 2 Players

Kotaku has reached out to Valve for more context on what led to this massive wave of bannings and has yet to hear back. Dota 2 , like many online games , is open to potential exploitations of its ranked matchmaking systems. Smurfed accounts are new accounts opened by active players who can then be matched with inexperienced players and, ostensibly, score easy wins.

Boosting refers to the practice by which an account is raised to a higher rank by a third party, such as if a player hires someone else to play for them. Since ranked Dota 2 matches are only accessible after spending hours playing online, one can see why someone might want to take the easy way out by simply purchasing a smurfed account or paying a third party to boost them. Back in January , the developer banned 17, accounts that were suspected of abusing matchmaking in this way, and in September, it handed out year bans for several different infractions, including smurfing and boosting.

In a recent tweet, the dota 2 team announced that it has banned over 40k players.

This has caused many to become disillusioned with the game, and its staying power has been called into question by those who either play themselves or watch streams of the game. This has led to significantly higher wait times in matchmaking queues, among other problems. We have banned over 40, accounts for players who were found abusing matchmaking.

These bans will now appear as game bans in Steam as well as being matchmaking bans in Dota 2. It wasn’t too long ago that several toxic Dota 2 players were banned for an astonishing 19 years for bad behavior. At the time, the decision was celebrated by most players, but the responses this time around have been more mixed. The elimination of so many from an already dwindling player base has not helped matchmaking times at all, and with the vague explanation of “abusing matchmaking,” many are not entirely sure what the ban is for in the first place.

The sad fact is that, with Dota 2 ‘s reviews already plummeting from outside reasons, this mass banning may do more harm than good for the game’s reputation.

Valve bans over 40,000 Dota 2 players for abusing matchmaking

The news was rolled out as part of a DOTA 2 update blog post. Regarding the ban wave, Valve notes that several different groups of various bad actors will now be banned, including players with low behavior scores and players who are detected buying and selling Steam accounts. Anyone using exploits or cheats will also be banned. The blog post from Valve is currently offline, but a copy is available from Google Cache.

Smurf accounts — accounts created by the same player to deceptively present themselves as less experienced than they actually are — are also being cracked down on.

This article is a list of players banned from various notable establishments, e.g. leagues, anti-cheat systems and Valve events.

While VAC bans aren’t the focus of today’s story, they do demonstrate Valve’s no-nonsense approach to cheating and misbehavior in its games. Recently, this approach was further displayed when Valve opted to launch a wave of bans against “abusive” DOTA 2 players. The ban waves, among other things, were unveiled in a September 17 announcement post published by the DOTA 2 team, which has since been removed and subsequently preserved thanks to an archive.

The first ban wave affected players with “exceptionally low” behavior scores, and the second impacted those who bought or sold Steam accounts for the purposes of gaining a higher or lower matchmaking rank in DOTA 2. Other bans were dished out as well, for reasons that primarily relate but are not limited to cheating the matchmaking system. For example, some users would queue for one role but play another, which can rob a team of a much-needed support or tank hero.

In other cases, high-skilled or high-ranked players chose to create fresh accounts in order to “smurf” and effectively crush new or otherwise lower-skilled players. In addition to outright bans, Valve is making several changes to DOTA 2’s matchmaking systems and Ranked play requirements. To mitigate the smurfing issue, in particular, the company will require users to play hours before they can access Ranked play. That’s a steep requirement, but Valve hopes the change will allow its automated systems to catch high-skilled players with new accounts earlier, and place them in the appropriate matchmaking category before they become an issue.

As an additional precaution, Valve will require accounts to have a unique, valid phone number — this won’t stop the most dedicated smurfs out there, but it could slow them down.

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